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MUSEE MARMOTTAN / SMALL MUSEUMS WITH HUGE APPEAL

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Claude Monet's "Water Lilies" are the main attraction to this lovely museum.

The former hunting lodge of the Duke of Valmy lies just East of the Bois de Boulogne. It became the primary residence of his son, Paul, an avid collector of Napoleonic art. Upon Paul’s death, the home and its contents were willed to the Academie des Beaux-Arts, and two years later, in 1934, the property was opened as a museum.

Interestingly enough, the museum’s focus shifted from First Empire, to Impressionist, with bequests from major donors. The first such gift came in 1957 from the family of a doctor who cared for, and loved the work of, such Impressionist painters as Renoir, Manet, Pissarro, and Monet. Then in 1966 one of Claude Monet’s sons, gave the museum what is recognized to be the largest collection of work by Monet. His Water Lilies canvases are breathtaking and are reason enough to visit the Marmottan. There is also a beautiful collection of illuminated manuscripts from Medieval times, gifted from a single donor.

The neighborhood of the 16th arrondisement is a lovely area for a walk after your visit, as there are many small cafes and boutiques of interest close to the museum.

MUSEE MARMOTTAN

2 Rue Louis Boilly
16th Arrondisement
Metro: Muette
Hours 10am-6pm
Closed Monday



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TaraYr 11 Strathcona BGGSHouses of Parliament, reflections on the Thames 1905Claude MonetThe eiihbitxon Monet’s Garden at the NGV is absolutely stunning. Surrounded by Monet’s paintings, one is given an individual insight to Monet’s life experiences, personality, and his point of view. It is easy to get caught up in the wonderful atmosphere and closely experience Monet’s life and love for his garden. The painting, Houses of Parliament, reflections on the Thames 1905, painted on one of Monet’s visits to London, immediately draws and impresses with its bold colour, texture and shapes which combine into a striking atmosphere. The dramatic, soft, intense and scenic mood of this painting is wonderfully awe inspiring.Monet contrasts the bold building with the choppy, reflective surface of the River Thames and the fluffy, cloudy backdrop. He creates a strong impression of the building through the bold colours and shapes which help place us in the scene, feeling the enormity of the structure. The harmonious colours in the painting bring a sense of unity. The short and dappled horizontal strokes effectively create the impression of the reflective surface of the water. This contrasts with the subtle, curvy strokes that create the texture of the cloudy sky. The contrasting textures of the different parts of nature equally bring out each other’s beauty, and complement the solid structure of the parliament buildings, presenting to us a symbol of how the beauty of nature can so well complement the man-made. Monet creates a unique and expressive view of nature and buildings in harmony.

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